Storyhunter logo

Antonio F.'s photo

Antonio F.

Rome, Italy

$200 - $2000 / Day

Start a project

To contact Antonio, post your first project.

Top Services

  • Documentary DP

  • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist

  • News Shooter / Video Journalist

Equipment

Video

  • 2K video camera
  • 4K video camera
  • Full HD video camera
  • Multiple cameras
  • DSLR or equivalent
  • GoPro or equivalent
  • Drone

Audio

  • External recorder
  • Wireless lavalier mic
  • Shotgun mic

Miscellaneous

  • Lighting kit
  • Stabilizer
  • Shoulder rig
  • Sliders
  • Live streaming equipment

About Antonio

Antonio Faccilongo is an Italian documentary photographer and filmmaker, photography professor at Rome University of Fine Arts and is represented by Getty Reportage. After graduating in communication sciences, and then obtaining a masters in photojournalism, he focused his attention on Asia and the Middle East, principally in Israel and Palestine, covering social, political and cultural issues. Documenting the aftermath of Palestinian-Israeli conflict in West Bank and Gaza Strip, he sought to unveil and highlight the humanitarian issues hidden within one of the world’s most reported conflicts, because too often it is shown only as a place of war and conflict. His long-term projects about women and their families in Palestine have received several awards and grants including World Press Photo story of the year 2021 nominee, World Press Photo in long-term projects category, FotoEvidence Book Award with World Press Photo, Getty editorial grant, National Geographic Society Covid-19 Emergency Fund 2021 recipient, 1st prize World Understanding Award at POYi Pictures of the year International, Best color documentary at Gomma Grant, 1st prize at LuganoPhotoDays, 1st prize at Umbria World Fest, 1st prize at Kuala Lumpur Photo Awards, 2nd Prize at PhMuseum and was finalist at Visa D'or feature, Lucas Dolega award adn shortlisted at Alexia Foundation. Furthermore his long-term projects have been exhibited internationally at numerous shows and festivals including World Press Photo Festival, Les Rencontres d’Arles, Zoom Festival, Festival della fotografia etica, PHmuseum online photobook festival, Buenos Aires Biennial, screened at Visa pour l'image Perpignan and was included on global campaign #WomenMatter against the violence toward women made by Dysturb. His work and assignments have been published in some of the most prominent international publications including National Geographic, Time, Stern, Der Spiegel, Le Monde, Geo, The Guardian, 6Mois, Paris Match, Focus, Sette, L'Espresso, Internazionale and many others.

Top Projects

  • Digital heroin

    • Documentary DP
    • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist
    • News Shooter / Video Journalist
    • Drone Operator

    In 1997 there were 300,000 computers in China and 620,000 citizens were able to surf the web. Now, over two decades later that number has exploded. According to the government agency China Internet Network Information Center, 802 million Chinese people now have access to internet, making China the world’s largest online community. But in recent years, another figure has also mushroomed: the number of people addicted to internet and online gaming. In 2019, the number of young victims of this addiction totaled 24 million. As our sources in China say, with the global spread of coronavirus, which began in the city of Wuhan in China, and the consequent isolation, all forms of addiction have increased across the country. The emotional stress citizens are subjected to amplifies the old addictions. This is particularly true of internet and online gaming addiction. There are some 198 million e-sports fans worldwide, with around 75 million living in China. This is the largest concentration of fans globally. The economic interests at stake are high. It is estimated that the Chinese video game industry alone is worth $30 billion in annual revenues and currently involves over half a billion people. In recent years, the gaming industry lobbyists have even attempted to have e-ports included at the Olympics, so far without success. Professional video game competitions have existed for many years, but their expansion in the last five years has been exponential. These competitions began as niche events for players who wanted to test their skills. Gradually tournaments have taken place within ultra-modern arenas with thousands of screaming fans and mind-boggling jackpots that can reach several million Euros. Professional players train up to 14 hours per day, 7 days a week. They are assisted by professional teams that guide their careers and egg them on to give their best for the good of the team and to accrue higher earnings. Usually each team is made up of 15 players and also includes a coach, a physiotherapist, a doctor and various managers. The stakes are high. Those who make mistakes are immediately replaced and are unlikely to be given a second chance. The career of these athletes begins early, at around 15 years old, but it also generally burns out in a flash, usually by the time they are around 23. This happens because the hype and stress prompts players to drop out and pursue a different lifestyle. Another reason is that by 23 cognitive reflexes begin to decline and performance suffers. The stakes and level of professionalism in this sector are so high that some Chinese universities have launched special courses in e-sports to train future champions. Here, the students mainly study advanced gaming techniques. After the first year they are divided into different classes. The best ones focus on becoming professional players while the others are taught the administrative, financial, promotional and planning part of the business. Growing numbers of young people in China dream of becoming professional e-sports athletes. But only a small number will really make it. And many of them run into serious problems in trying to achieve their dream. In 2008, the first country to declare internet addiction a clinical disorder was China, de facto recognizing the danger of internet addiction to people and society. Many young Chinese people spend almost their whole lives in internet cafés, where they can surf and play online. They completely lose all sense of time and space, finding it hard to stop playing and reconnect with reality. They spend whole days or nights connected playing League of Legends or Counter-Strike, which are two leading games in the sector. Deaths from heart attacks and strokes are now common and the numbers are growing. They are largely caused by ever stronger addiction and tournaments that keep body and mind at high stress levels that can last up to 40 consecutive hours nonstop. Sometimes, to avoid leaving their screens, the young people even wear sanitary pads and adult diapers. This compulsion, often likened to heroin addiction, is currently affecting a whole generation of young Chinese men and women. Beijing has taken some steps to try and curb its effects. For instance, a law has been enacted that regulates the length of gaming sessions by a single player. The result is that “zapping” has become common. The time limit on video gaming is eluded by jumping from one game to another using the maximum number of minutes allowed but on an almost unlimited number of games, effectively nullifying the measure. In the late 1990s when the problem barely existed, the first rehabilitation centers were set up in China to cope with the disorder. Today they are widespread across the country, hosting thousands of children and teens sent by their families in search of a cure. These camps resemble basic training military basic facilities. The inmates wear camouflage suits, they’re drilled for hours like soldiers and are trained to overcome obstacles and withstand hardships. Rigor and discipline are paramount. Those who break the rules risk solitary confinement. On many occasions such centers have been criticized for the harshness of their treatments. One center became notorious after it emerged they were using electroconvulsive therapy to treat some intense forms of addiction. Over the years, stories of abuse have prompted the Chinese government to regulate them more carefully. The Zheng Xin center in Weifang is one of the most important in China for diagnosing and treating internet addiction. The Zheng Xin center consists of several buildings with classrooms, a gym, offices, a canteen, dormitories, a hall for presenting shows, a cinema and a courtyard where the inmates perform athletic exercises. Electronic devices of all kinds are banished from the camp. The treatment consists of a combination of drug therapy, psychological counselling, exercise and activities with family members, whom the inmates can meet once a month. The duration of the treatment is unpredictable. It generally lasts at least 6 months, but there are cases of young people who have been interned for up to 2 years. Day at the camp begins at 6 a.m. After the usual cleaning and the Marines-style roll call of standing to attention, training begins. First, campers march at an impeccable rhythm and then do gymnastics to activate body and mind. At the end of this first phase, they all run to the canteen where they will eat a well-earned breakfast. During the rest of the day they practice physical activities, such as Tai Chi, gymnastics, running, walking, yoga, and artistic pursuits such as singing, acting, drawing and other relaxing activities. The dormitories are spartan and functional. The bunk beds have thin mattresses and there are straw mats in each room. After dinner the inmates wash their uniforms and then it’s lights out. The damage being inflicted on the younger generation hardly seems to interest the e-sports industry. It’s too focused on maximizing its profits. But today above all, given the situation created by the global health crisis, it is vital for health programs to put the well-being of these young people first. They are — and always will be — the main source from which the world grows and from which it will have to start again.

  • THE CHINESE DREAM

    • Documentary DP
    • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist
    • Reporter / Journalist
    • News Shooter / Video Journalist
    • Drone Operator
    • Portrait Photographer
    • Executive Producer

    In China there is a dream which goes by the name of Huaxi. A small village comprising only 250 peasant families, who since the early 60s, before China opened to the global market, set up an international import-export business in the joinery nail sector. At present the corporation counts over 100 companies including textiles, metallurgy, digital economy and business finance. Incredibly today the descendants of the founding families own the world’s sixth largest holding, Jiangsu Huaxi Jituan Gonsi. Approximately one third of the village revenue is generated by the steel industry. The holding imports raw materials from India and Brazil and exports its products to over 40 countries. Furthermore, village executives are planning to increase tourism. Internal Chinese tourism appears to be on the rise and it is estimated that 2 million tourists every year travel to the small community to witness first hand this “model of a socialist village”. The sky above Huaxi is saturated with the smoke of the factories intent on producing wealth. Since they opened, production was stopped on only one occasion: during the recent Coronavirus pandemic. The government in China, like in Italy, decided to shut down all factories and to safeguard its citizens’ health through isolation. Luckily this area was not directly hit by the epidemic, otherwise the effect on its residents would have been dramatic as the factory workers often live in run down compounds inside the factories themselves with several families living together in the same room. After almost two months, with the emergency over, production has finally resumed and the population has returned to daily life. For years, the Chinese authorities have used Huaxi as a prime example of success to be showcased, proving how the communist regime has transformed a poor village into an immensely rich area in just half a century. One of the lines of its anthem recites “The skies above Huaxi are the skies of the communist party, the land of Huaxi is the land of socialism”. Huaxi stands about one hundred kilometres west of Shanghai, in the Jangsu region. In Bejing they call it “the number one village under the sky”, intending it is the most beautiful village in China. The town, which takes its name from the river crossing it, is the perfect synthesis of socialist collectivism and Asian capitalism. Despite it being the richest village in China, Huaxi is very small. Its surface totals a mere 240 acres, less than the Vatican City. In 1964 mayor Wu Renbao convinced Huaxi’s inhabitants to invest their money in the construction of a nail producing factory without the authorities knowing. The income generated by this secret activity was divided equally and regardless of their duties among the 1,600 peasants who were the actual shareholders. This business embodied the concept of capitalism, in opposition with the socialist ideologies of the time and this is why the factory’s activities were initially kept secret. When Beijing found out about the business they shut it down completely and imprisoned the mayor. With the death of Mao and thanks to the subsequent opening up of China to the global market, Huaxi was able to reopen its factories and make the most of its past experience and the international contacts it had cultivated, finding itself at an advantage against the competition of the industrial activities being set up. Growth was rapid and exponential, reaching out to other activities as well. Huaxi’s fortune appears immense. The village reached great notoriety throughout the country in 2003 when it announced its annual turnover had reached 100 billion yuan, approximately 14 billion Euros. In order to prove its economic strength in 2015 the village even spent 400 million Euros in building its own sky scraper, towering in the centre of an expanse of small country houses and factories. The tower is one of the highest in the world. With its 72 floors it is 328 metres high and has been named “Hauxi’s hanging village”. The building even houses a 5-star hotel, the Long Wish International Hotel, with a large golden ball which can be seen from afar dominating on its rooftop. Its immense hall walls are lacquered in gold and there is also a statue of a calf in solid gold, symbolizing not only the place’s immense economic power but also its profound connection with the earth and peasant life. Further, as the 7-day work week does not leave the villagers much time to travel, Wu Renbao decided he would bring the world to Huaxi. The village has a “World Park” with replicas of famous monuments such as the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, the Statue of Liberty and the Arc de Triomphe. The 2000 residents who make up the founding families benefit from special privileges. The majority of the holding’s dividends are reinvested, the rest are divided equally among them, irrespective of the role they have in the company. They say that each member has 250,000$ in their bank account. By birth right they receive a 400 square metre villa and a luxury car, free health service, education and a pension as well as free cooking oil. However, in order to deserve these benefits they have to conform to strict social rules. They are only allowed to marry other founding family members, there are no cafés, clubs, Internet cafés or karaoke clubs and gambling and drugs are strictly prohibited. The village has been conceived so as not to provide any kind of distraction to labourers who are expected to work as much as possible. However, it is not all wonderful in Huaxi. The village work force is also made up of 25,000 immigrant workers who fare in the same conditions as all other Chinese labourers and work seven days a week with 12-hour shifts for a wage ranging between 200$ – 300$ a month. They get 5 days off a year during the Republic’s festivities and have none of the luxurious benefits that the “first class” citizens enjoy. Strangely, this village which boasts being the richest in China, has very few stores catering to its rich residents, For this reason the fortunate owners of the holding move to the nearby city if Wuxi when they need to have access to quality high-end services. The metropolis counts 6 million people, it is the region’s business hub and is located on the high-speed railway connecting Shanghai and Beijing. Here they can find all the western-style luxury services, shopping malls selling the most famous Italian and French brands, golf clubs, wellness centres, cosmetic surgery clinics, luxury car retailers and jewellery stores. Unparalleled wealth, exclusive comfort and at the same time no possibility of distraction; an underpaid workforce denied any access to the privileges reserved for members of the founding families. This is Huaxi, the Chinese “village under the sky”.

  • MY BROTHER IS A ONLY CHILD

    • Documentary DP
    • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist
    • Reporter / Journalist
    • News Shooter / Video Journalist
    • Drone Operator
    • Portrait Photographer
    • Executive Producer

    China is ageing at the same rate as its economy is growing. Its population growth rate is experiencing a considerable reduction due to the decrease in births, setting the foundations not only for potential demographic and economic crises in the near future but a political one as well. Furthermore, the global upheaval due to the coronavirus pandemic which began in Wuhan, has forced millions of Chinese to social distancing, causing a considerable decrease in the number of pregnancies in the first months of 2020 and probably throughout 2021 as well. For years China implemented a series of policies aimed at slowing down the world’s most populous nation’s growth, including its notorious single child law. The long-term effect of such a policy is that today China has a negative demographic growth. In 2019 the number of new-borns was the lowest in the last 60 years at a constant 1.04%. Such a significant decrease in births and a rise in life expectancy mean that soon the work force will not be able to support such a numerous old age population. By 2050, the percentage of people over 60 years of age will rise to 34%, while the percentage of people within the working age range will decrease to 51%. That means only 1.5 workers per pensioner. This type of rapid inversion has potentially disastrous repercussions on the economy and social stability. Since 2016 the Chinese government, in the attempt to find a solution and counter this trend, has modified and eased the one child policy, but figures show that births are still in decline. This regulation was introduced in 1978 with the aim of preventing excessive population growth. Since 2016 the Beijing government has implemented the «two children» policy, allowing this possibility to couples where one of the two partners is an only child. If during the 1980s and 1990s the low birth rate was determined by the ban on having more than one child, today the causes of this trend are to be found in dynamics of a social nature. Chinese families are free to choose to keep their families small and one of the main reasons for this is the cost of child services, increasing urbanization, the rising number of women working and high costs of education. The expenses that couple face in building a family are high. According to the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences the average cost of raising a child to the age of 16 in China amounts to 490,000 yuan. This figure is confirmed by Tao Zhang who tells us that their annual cost amounts to roughly 5.000€ year. The great majority of Chinese workers do not earn enough to support a child, let alone two. Despite the turnover being generated by weddings being on the increase with costs rising by 25% a year, a decline in the number of marriages has been registered. According to Ministry of Civil Affairs data the number of marriages in 2019 was around 9.47 million, a drop from the 10.1 million of the previous year. In this case also the negative marriage trend has its roots mainly in economic and social issues. Young Chinese have taken a distance from the traditions of previous generations. Their scale of priorities has changed both through choice and due to necessity. For some of them staying single means great career prospects, while marriage no longer represents a necessity as it did for their parents. They get married in large cities, looking for the prospect of a better future and betting all their stakes, or almost, on their career. However, the job market in large metropolises is extremely competitive and the exhausting work hours and elevated cost of living as well as an inefficient welfare system mean that an increasing number of young people are reluctant to set up a family. Finding a partner and making a relationship work requires the investment of time and energy, which this generation does not appear to have. Consequently the average age of newlyweds has also increased: if in 2000 it was 23 years of age, in 2017 it had gone up to 26. Another problem which affects young people is the great pressure put on by their families. According to popular Chinese culture people should get married very young and are considered too old if they haven’t by the age of 25 or 26. This creates high expectations and puts a lot of pressure on young people. In Beijing – but also in the rest of China – inside the Forbidden City parents as well as wedding agents meet twice a week to try and set up marriages for their sons and daughters who are considered too old to successfully do so themselves. Here they exchange photographs, curriculums and try to understand if the social and economic standings are satisfactory to both parties. A real bride and bridegroom market. The search for a partner is further complicated by the number of men being much higher than that of women. This is due to the one child policy which led many families in the country-side to “discard” females in favour of males who were considered more productive and could lend a hand with the hard rural life. Today this elevated number of men belonging to the lower social classes has difficulty in finding women of a higher social standing willing to marry them. Another aspect which should be taken into consideration is the difficulty young Chinese have communicating with the opposite sex and establishing intimate relationships. The change in lifestyle of the young is increasingly characterized by an obsessive, in some cases even maniacal, use of technology and social media. The consequences of their compulsive use are evident: the young are totally unable to engage in social relationships and communicate with others in the real world. 45% of Chinese male adolescents between the ages of 13 and 19 today say they have no interest in love or sex. Living almost exclusively through electronic gadgets can cause a sense of alienation and a detachment which as a consequence is changing social relations and particularly the way youths are engaging with each other. Contact in real life has become mor rare and for this reason harder. The government of Beijing has so far had a timid approach to try and curb the problem, the measures it has implemented have not had the desired effects. A number of state-supported services have been established in the attempt to meet the need for a sentimental education. For example, through an app it is possible to “rent” a boyfriend or girlfriend by the hour, not for sex purposes, but to learn how to behave with the other gender doing simple activities like going for a walk holding hands or discovering how one should behave when in a relationship. This is undoubtedly the greatest and most important challenge facing China. If no solution is found to the ageing of its population this could lead to the collapse of its health and pension system as well as to the downfall of its general economy, plummeting the country into a recession like that of the 1960s.

  • Kaiseliit

    • Documentary DP
    • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist
    • Reporter / Journalist
    • News Shooter / Video Journalist
    • Drone Operator
    • Executive Producer

    On a cold and wet May morning, Ivar, the head of the Estonian Defense League (Kaitseliit) in Lüganuse, heads down at dawn to setup the training camp where all the members of his group will reunite. Ivar does not receive any compensation or preferential treatment for his work. What drives him and all the other participants is the strong sense of patriotism, the desire to be useful for the community and to establish the sovereignty of the Estonian Nation together with other compatriots. After a coffee, jam toast and a hot low-calorie porridge, the members of the Kaitseliit begin the training day relaxed and smiling. The training, which is aimed at civilians and not soldiers, is organized on weekends, so that everybody can take part in the activities. It is very interesting to enter the private lives of these people, and to understand why common citizens choose to support a cause much bigger than them as individuals. Stephan, one of the oldest members of the group, proudly shows us his car, a shiny yellow, Russian era Lambda. He tells us with nostalgia how he has contributed to the Estonian cause and to this organization over the past years. These days, since he is too old to actively take part in training, he takes care of the safety of the training activities. His wife, just like many other women of her age, manages the provisions, cooking and taking care of the meals and beverages. Everyone has a task and the contribution of everyone is crucial for the continued functionality of this dynamic organization. Even with this high level of effort and heightened sense of responsibility, the mood during Kaitseliit training is relatively relaxed and calm. These days are comprised half on military training and half of athletic competition. Participants, divided into groups based on age and gender, are organized into teams of tree, facing a number of challenges to test their abilities and the skills that they have acquired during their weekly meetings hosted by the respective affiliated groups, spread out over an arduous 12-kilometer course. A considerable amount of training is needed in order to face all of the hidden dangers along the course: quicksand, hills, woods and rivers. The participants have to pass through 13 trials in total. The winners do not do this for some award or military gold start, but for the respect and esteem of their fellow volunteers and to serve as teachers, during future sessions, for the new and younger members of the group. Furthermore, they will have the honor of taking part in annual spring military training, called Kevadtorm, which is organized every year in May with the official Estonian army, which additionally involves the involvement of NATO military forces. When the training day is over, each member returns home to their daily lives and occupations. Johanna goes back to being a housewife, Geril goes back to his university textbooks, Ingrid returns to treating the teeth of her patients and Veronica goes on with her art. The most important task of the Kaitseliit is not in facto handing down military capabilities to future generations. It is to divulge the ideals of homeland, independence and collective identity to a young nation that has experienced several occupations during its recent history. For this reason, numerous promotional days are organized by the Kaitseliit. They take place in areas of high density, such as shopping centers, stations and public squares during holy days, in order to spread the message, engage new people and collect subscriptions from future members. During these events it is possible to see senior members performing military activities, and to experience in real life the sensation of getting into a tank, to listen to the experiences of their members or to get information from the specialty stands regarding the activities the Kaitseliit organises. Even children can participate in these initiatives with great curiosity and fun, attracted by the uniforms or by the machinery on display, and can get involved with the adults through activities and games suitable for their age. Obviously no one, young or old alike, are incited by violence or looking to disperse other nations or populations. It is important to make clear that the Kaitseliit is not an extremist group to serve as a military offense against foreigners. On the contrary, it serves as an organization founded in order to strengthen national pride inside of its borders.

  • Softair

    • Documentary DP
    • News Shooter / Video Journalist
    • Video Editor - News
    • Production Company
    • Sound Mixer
    • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist

    Report about softair in Italy. I took videos, sound and photos, and I edit all the work.

All Services

Pre-Production

  • Executive Producer
  • Fixer
  • Production Company

Production Support

  • 360 Commercial Video
  • 360 Documentary Video
  • 360 News Video
  • Editorial Photographer / Photojournalist
  • Event Photographer
  • Fashion Photographer
  • Landscape Photographer
  • Portrait Photographer
  • Product Photographer
  • On-Air Reporter / Host
  • Commercial DP
  • Corporate Videographer
  • Documentary DP
  • Drone Operator
  • Mobile Journalist / Livestreamer
  • News Shooter / Video Journalist
  • Reporter / Journalist

Post-Production

  • Sound Mixer
  • Video Editor - Commercial
  • Video Editor - Documentary
  • Video Editor - News

Antonio's Clients

  • Inside Over

Similar Freelancers